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Standards Assessment Report

 

Introduction & Purpose of Report

 

Welcome to the AdvancED Standards Assessment Report. 

 

The Standards Assessment Report is designed to serve as a valuable self-assessment and as a tool to help schools prepare for their Quality Assurance Review.  The report is based on the AdvancED standards, which serve as the foundation of the accreditation process.  In order to earn and maintain accreditation, schools must meet the AdvancED standards, engage in a process of continuous improvement, and host a Quality Assurance Review at least once every five years.

 

The Standards Assessment Report engages the school community in an in-depth assessment of each of the seven AdvancED standards.  In completing the report, the school identifies the data, information, evidence, and documented results that validate that it is meeting each standard.  This self assessment helps the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement. 

 

The Standards Assessment Report also serves as the primary resource for the Quality Assurance Review Team, which uses the report to prepare for the visit to the school.  The team uses insights gathered from the report and information obtained during the on-site visit to provide feedback to the school and to make an accreditation recommendation.

 

Structure of the Report

 

The Standards Assessment Report is designed for online completion.  This Microsoft Word version has been streamlined for easy viewing and sharing.  This streamlined version includes two sections:  1) indicators rubric and 2) focus questions. 

 

The indicators rubric enables the school to assess the degree to which practices and/or processes are in place that indicate adherence to the standard and indicators.  For each indicator, the school may check if the practices and/or processes are highly functional in the school, operational, emerging, or not evident.  The school should use the rubric as an opportunity to ask itself challenging questions and to respond with accurate answers geared toward self-improvement.  After completing the rubric, the school can quickly see areas of strength and opportunity.  The section asks, “To what degree are the noted practices/processes in place?”

 

The focus questions allow the school to expand on and think more deeply about the responses to the indicators rubric.  The focus questions provide an opportunity for the school to describe the systematic and systemic processes that are in place to support its ability to meet the indicators.  The section asks, “How are the practices/processes implemented?”

 

 

The online version of the Standards Assessment Report includes three additional sections: 1) considering the evidence; 2) overall assessment rubric; and 3) peer-to-peer practice submission.

 

The section entitled “considering the evidence” allows school personnel to think about the practices and/or processes being implemented and identify evidence that will support its responses to the indicators rubric and focus questions.  This section helps school stakeholders engage in a discussion about how it knows it is adhering to the standards.  The section is not intended to engage the school in a collection of evidence, but rather in thoughtful dialogue about how it can demonstrate that quality practices, conditions, and results are occurring in the school.  The section asks, “What practices/processes are being implemented, and are they effective?” or said another way, “How do we know we are doing what we say we are doing?”  You can access examples of evidence on the online version by simply clicking on the “considering the evidence” link for each standard.  The examples can also be accessed as a standalone Microsoft Word document entitled “Examples of Evidence” that can be downloaded in conjunction with this document.

 

The overall assessment describes how well schools are implementing practices and/or processes and the impact these practices and/or processes have on student results and ov, erall school effectiveness.  The overall assessment helps schools judge where they are in relation to each standard.  The “operational” level is required in order to demonstrate meeting the standard. The section asks, “How well are we meeting the standard overall?”  In addition to this section being integrated into the online Standards Assessment Report, we have made the overall assessment rubric available as a standalone Microsoft Word document that can be downloaded in conjunction with this document.

 

The peer-to-peer submission section asks the school to share an effective practice.  The submission allows the school to highlight a practice that it feels is indicative of the quality work occurring in the school.  The review team may refer to the practice and use it as the basis for identifying other successful practices occurring in the school.  In addition, the practice is included in the online AdvancED Resource Network where it can be accessed by other AdvancED schools and districts.  Further detail on submitting a peer-to-peer practice is provided just prior to the conclusion section of this document.

 

Completion and Submission of the Report

 

This Standards Assessment Report is to be completed by the school six weeks to six months prior to hosting a Quality Assurance Review (QAR) visit.  It is strongly recommended that a wide and broad cross-section of the school community participate in completing this report.  The completed report is submitted to AdvancED for use by the QAR team.

 

Directions for Completing the Report

 

Complete the Indicators Rubric, indicating the option that most accurately reflects the progress your school has made toward meeting the standards and indicators.  Answer the focus questions related to the Quality School Indicators for each standard. Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.  If you use this document as a working draft of your report, please note that when you copy and paste content from this document to your web-based Standards Assessment Report, some special characters (such as dashes and colons) may not copy and you may need to do some minor editing of the format.  Using the overall assessment rubric (separate downloadable document), indicate the option that most accurately reflects the school’s overall assessment of meeting the standard.


 Vision & Purpose

 

STANDARD:              The school establishes and communicates a shared purpose and direction for improving the performance of students and the effectiveness of the school.

Impact Statement:  A school is successful in meeting this standard when it commits to a shared purpose and direction.  The school establishes expectations for student learning aligned with the school’s vision that is supported by school personnel and external stakeholders.  These expectations serve as the focus for assessing student performance and school effectiveness.  The school’s vision guides allocations of time and human, material, and fiscal resources.

Indicators Rubric

Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are in place in the school.  The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement as well as guide and inform the school’s responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

 

INDICATORS

 

 

 

In fulfillment of this standard, the school:

Not Evident

Emerging

Operational

Highly Functional

1.1

Establishes a vision for the school in collaboration with its stakeholders

 

 

 

X

1.2

Communicates the vision and purpose to build stakeholder understanding and support

 

 

 

X

1.3

Identifies goals to advance the vision

 

 

 

X

1.4

Develops and continuously maintains a profile of the school, its students, and the community

 

 

 

X

1.5

Ensures that the school’s vision and purpose guide the teaching and learning process

 

 

 

X

1.6

Reviews its vision and purpose systematically and revises them when appropriate

 

 

 

X

 

Definitions of Indicators Rubric

Not Evident                Little or no evidence exists

Emerging                     Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of implementation of practice

Operational                 Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively implemented

Highly Functional        Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully integrated and effectively and consistently implemented

 

Focus Questions

Please respond to the following questions regarding the processes that are in place to support the school’s implementation of the research-based practices outlined in the indicators rubric.  Responses to these questions should support the school’s self-assessment on the indicators rubric.  Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.       What is the process for establishing and building understanding of and commitment to the vision statement among stakeholders? <!--[endif]-->

 

The process for establishing the vision at Carver School of Technology involved the schools’ design team and first year instructional staff. The design team was formed by the district in 2005 to develop a 21st Century technology school. The design team consisted of business partners, community leaders, and district personnel. After the staff assembled at the Institute of Student Achievement (ISA) summer retreat, the team worked on the vision statement based on the schools’ original design.

 

The vision of the school is revisited at the beginning of each school year by the Leadership Team during pre-planning time, as well as by the Local School Council (LSC) and PTSA, to confirm that it still fits the purpose of the school. Our students and teachers all learn the vision and mission as part of the induction process. Building understanding and commitment is ongoing. The vision and mission are posted throughout the school and publicized through newsletters, brochures, school websites, and community meetings. The vision and mission are reviewed during the school year at school assemblies (Meeting of the Minds), community and partner meetings, and student advisory sessions.

 

With a focus on improving academic achievement, the Institute for Student Achievement partnered with our school and school district to create an autonomous small school and to transform a large comprehensive high school into academically rigorous, personalized learning environments, which prepare all students for success in college and beyond.  This partnership involves the assignment of a Coach, bi-annual standardized benchmark assessments, on-sight instructional monitoring, professional development, and parent and student surveys.

 

 

Vision: A 21st Century Education Supported by Academic Excellence and Caring.

 

Mission Statement: Our mission is to ensure that all of our students are prepared for success in life and in college.  Students will experience a technology—rich instructional program that imparts the values of literacy and numeracy.  Our school promotes diversity and prepares students to be globally competitive.  We will ensure that our students become committed life—long learners.  Pride, integrity, and leadership are the principles that guide the School of Technology.

 

Statement of Beliefs:

  • All students can learn.
  • Ethical behavior will guide all students and other members of the school community in their interactions with each other, their pursuit of knowledge, and their use of technology.
  • The use of technology supports and enhances the development of students and prepares them to meet the challenges of society.
  • Education is a cooperative effort of students, families, educators, and the community.
  • Commitment to continuous self-evaluation and school improvement is necessary to ensure that students become productive citizens.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.      What is the school’s process for developing a profile and systematically maintaining and using information that describes the school, its students, and their performance? <!--[endif]-->

 

Research Planning and Accountability (RPA) initiates the process for developing the school’s profile by using centrally collected student demographic and performance data. The demographic data show characteristics of our student body, while performance data includes results from assessment tools: SAT, PSAT, CRCT, GHSGT, EOCT and district benchmark tests. The school maintains an accurate and current student profile through our student information system, Infinite Campus.

 

The Leadership Team provides the oversight of the SAT, PSAT, GHSGT, EOCT, and district benchmark assessment process.  In addition, the staff administers diagnostic assessments (formative and summative) periodically to determine student progress. The school includes its local testing in the assessment process along with collecting and maintaining data. This process involves assessment distribution, data analysis, and instructional modification, and communication to stakeholders. Data analysis of assessment data is not limited to the Leadership Team but shared with the Grade Level Teams, where in turn teachers explore strategies to utilize the data to improve student learning. The data provide a framework in the development and implementation of the School Achievement Plan (SAP). The SAP and school data are communicated to all stakeholders through PTSA and LSC meetings, newsletters, assemblies, and the school’s website.

 

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.      How does the leadership ensure that the school’s vision, purpose, and goals guide the teaching and learning process? <!--[endif]-->

 

 

The Atlanta Public Schools provides the Carver School of Technology with laptops to support the one-to-one computing model of a 21st Century school. The leadership provides teachers with the supplies, materials, curriculum support, and professional development to achieve the school’s vision in accordance with teaching and learning best practices. With these resources, teachers provide instruction aligned with the vision and goals of the school.

 

To validate that the vision and goals guide teaching and learning, the leadership conducts formal and informal classroom observations and focus walks throughout the year. Each instructor is considered to be an instructional designer and follows the school’s instructional agenda which is aligned with the State’s instructional framework (Opening, Work Session and Closing). The leadership reviews each teacher’s lesson plans weekly. During weekly team meetings, teachers and support staff discuss the content of lesson plans and provide feedback so that instruction supports student learning.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.      What process is used to ensure that the vision and purpose of the school remain current and aligned with the school’s expectations for student learning and school effectiveness? <!--[endif]-->

 

Professional development provided for the teachers is a mainstay of the culture of the School of Technology and the primary conduit used to ensure that the vision and purpose of the school remain aligned with the school’s expectations for student learning and school effectiveness. During the first month of the school year, teachers receive a professional development calendar informing them about training to be provided onsite in the use of the technology available at our school to support classroom instruction. Our onsite professional development ensures a full integration of technology with instructional Best Practices in the classroom.

 

The school’s leadership and staff review student performance data on a regular basis and make modifications to the instructional plan to guide teaching and learning. This monitoring process ensures the connection among professional development, instruction, and student achievement in relation to the school’s goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Governance & Leadership

 

STANDARD:              The school provides governance and leadership that promote student performance and school effectiveness.

Impact Statement:  A school is successful in meeting this standard when it has leaders who are advocates for the school’s vision and improvement efforts.  The leaders provide direction and allocate resources to implement curricular and co-curricular programs that enable students to achieve expectations for their learning.  Leaders encourage collaboration and shared responsibility for school improvement among stakeholders.  The school’s policies, procedures, and organizational conditions ensure equity of learning opportunities and support for innovation.

Indicators Rubric

Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are in place in the school.  The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement as well as guide and inform the school’s responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

 

 

INDICATORS

 

 

 

In fulfillment of this standard, the school operates under the jurisdiction of a governing board that:

Not Evident

Emerging

Operational

Highly Functional

2.1

Establishes policies and procedures that provide for the effective operation of the school

 

 

X

 

2.2

Recognizes and preserves the executive, administrative, and leadership prerogatives of the administrative head of the school

 

 

 

X

2.3

Ensures compliance with applicable local, state, and federal laws, standards, and regulations

 

 

 

X

In fulfillment of this standard, the school has leadership that:

 

 

 

 

2.4

Employs a system that provides for analysis and review of student performance and school effectiveness

 

 

 

X

2.5

Fosters a learning community

 

 

 

X

2.6

Provides teachers and students opportunities to lead

 

 

 

X

2.7

Provides stakeholders meaningful roles in the decision-making process that promote a culture of participation, responsibility, and ownership

 

 

 

X

2.8

Controls curricular and extracurricular activities that are sponsored by the school

 

 

 

X

2.9

Responds to community expectations and stakeholder satisfaction

 

 

X

 

2.10

Implements an evaluation system that provides for the professional growth of all personnel

 

 

 

X

 

Definitions of Indicator Rubric

Not Evident                Little or no evidence exists

Emerging                     Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of implementation of practice

Operational                 Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively implemented

Highly Functional        Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully integrated and effectively and consistently implemented

 

Focus Questions

Please respond to the following questions that focus on the processes that are in place to support the school’s implementation of the practices outlined in the indicators rubric.  Responses to these questions should support the school’s self-assessment on the indicators rubric.  Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.       What is the process for establishing, communicating, and implementing policies and procedures for the effective operation of the school? <!--[endif]-->

 

The establishment of policies for the effective operation of the school begins with the development and distribution of such policy from the Atlanta Board of Education. These policies are then shared annually with stakeholders at the beginning of the school year through the distribution of the Student Handbook. The handbook contains specific policies and a guide to the rights and responsibilities of students. All policies are available on the Atlanta Public Schools website:  https://eboard.eboardsolutions.com/Index.aspx?S=4004.

 

In addition to distributing the Student Handbook, the School of Technology distributes a Faculty Handbook that describes our school’s daily operating procedures. In its day-to-day operations the School of Technology is governed by a Leadership Team that is comprised of the following individuals: our principal, assistant principal, one teacher from every grade level, a special education teacher, a special area teacher, a paraprofessional, and our parent liaison, and their responsibility is to implement school operational procedures.

 

An integral part of the School of Technology organizational framework is the Local School Council (LSC). The LSC is comprised of the principal, PTSA President, SGA President, Parent Advisory Council representative, Student Advisory Council representative, parent-business partner, parent representative, two teachers, and community business partner. They provide the governing support that monitors the implementation of the School Achievement Plan. Bimonthly meetings keep communication ongoing between the Leadership Team and the LSC, and as partners, their role is to assist in securing the resources for effective operation of the school and student achievement. Presently, they are working on securing a crosswalk on McDonough Blvd at the Marta bus stop across from the school.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.      What process does the school’s leadership use to evaluate school effectiveness and student performance? <!--[endif]-->

 

The evaluation process at the School of Technology involves the collaborative efforts of several parties: Leadership Team, ISA Coach, Grade Level Teams, and LSC. The Leadership Team and ISA Coach conduct instructional audits of curriculum pacing guides and lesson plans.  The Leadership Team compares information from these audits to assessment data and recommends instructional modifications to the Grade Level Teams.  Teachers then implement instructional changes guided by assessment data. These data are reported to the LSC to keep them abreast of the progress being made in implementing the SAP. It is during this update that the LSC questions the sufficiency of resources and determines how it can best support the leadership’s efforts to improve student learning.

 

In addition, this process allows the Leadership Team to better assess the activities students are involved in both in and out of school that are specific to student academic achievement. This information was used to develop the Extended Day Program. The Extended Day Program provides students with additional academic support through tutorial services that are subject specific and test preparation focused, as well as extracurricular activities that support our 21st Century culture. This program is closely monitored by analyzing the test performance of participants in comparison to non-participants. After reviewing the performance level of students in the after-school program, the school makes modifications in the program as needed to improve student learning.

 

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.      In what ways are stakeholders, including staff, given opportunities to provide leadership and to contribute to the decision-making process? <!--[endif]-->

 

The biggest advantage of a small school is the opportunity for stakeholders and staff to provide leadership and contribute to the decision-making process. These opportunities are evident in staff meetings, Leadership Team Meetings, Grade Level Team meetings, PTSA, LSC, SGA, Advisory classes, as a member of the Student Advisory Council and Parent Advisory Council, staff retreats, service on committees, and as participants in the Extended Day Program. The principal reinforces a culture of participatory decision-making by establishing an ongoing pattern of discussing issues and concerns where in staff have input and share opinions. The leadership follows up readily on suggestions that staff make which adds value to stakeholder participation.

 

During a recent faculty meeting the principal, invited each staff member to share their first

8-week experiences, concerns, and issues. After the meeting, the Leadership Team addressed three immediate concerns and provided feedback to the concerned faculty. The Leadership Team will address the remaining documented concerns and issues at its next meeting.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.      What policies and processes are in place to ensure equity of learning opportunities and support for innovation? <!--[endif]-->

 

The policies set forth by the Atlanta Board of Education ensure and provide the framework for the equity of learning opportunities for all students at the School of Technology. These policies are supported by resources that establish the School of Technology as a 21st Century learning community. Teachers diagnose the needs of students as a part of classroom procedures then determine specific instruction in response to various needs. A critical component in the process is differentiated instruction.

 

Policies that mandate equity are supported by resources that establish the School of Technology as a 21st Century learning community.  These resources include Promethean boards in classrooms, computers that support one-to-one computing, a student folder on the school’s server, and the districts guidance and professional development in establishing highly functional Advisories. Each child, including those with special needs, experiences a technology-rich instructional setting during the school day, and receives the support of an Advisor.  These provisions are monitored by the Leadership Team and ISA Coach in conjunction with Grade Level Teams and individual teachers. Classroom initiatives are monitored through discussions within teams that are in turn reported to the leadership team.

 

To support equity in the instructional setting, tutors from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) are active participants in mathematics and science classes and provide immediate tutorial assistance in the classrooms for students who need additional academic support thus providing every student with access to opportunities for optimum educational advancement.

 

 


Teaching & Learning

 

STANDARD:              The school provides research-based curriculum and instructional methods that facilitate achievement for all students.

Impact Statement:  A school is successful in meeting this standard when it implements a curriculum based on clear and measurable expectations for student learning that provides opportunities for all students to acquire requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes.  Teachers use proven instructional practices that actively engage students in the learning process.  Teachers provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and skills to real world situations.  Teachers give students feedback to improve their performance.

Indicators Rubric

Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are in place in the school.  The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement as well as guide and inform the school’s responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

 

 

INDICATORS

 

 

 

In fulfillment of this standard, the school:

Not Evident

Emerging

Operational

Highly Functional

3.1

Develops and implements curriculum based on clearly defined expectations for student learning

 

 

 

X

,

3.2

Promotes active involvement of students in the learning process, including opportunities for them to explore application of higher-order thinking skills and investigate new approaches to applying their learning

 

 

 

X

3.3

Gathers, analyzes, and uses data and research in making curricular and instructional choices

 

 

X

 

3.4

Designs and uses instructional strategies, innovations, and activities that are research-based and reflective of best practice

 

 

 

X

3.5

Offers a curriculum that challenges each student to excel, reflects a commitment to equity, and demonstrates an appreciation of diversity

 

 

 

X

3.6

Allocates and protects instructional time to support student learning

 

 

 

X

3.7

Provides for articulation and alignment between and among all levels of schools

 

 

X

 

3.8

Implements interventions to help students meet expectations for student learning

 

 

 

X

3.9

Monitors school climate and takes appropriate steps to ensure that it is conducive to student learning

 

 

 

X

3.10

Provides comprehensive information and media services that support the curricular and instructional programs

 

 

X

 

3.11

Ensures that all students and staff members have regular and ready access to instructional technology and a comprehensive materials collection that supports the curricular and instructional program

 

 

 

X

 

Definitions of Indicator Rubric

Not Evident                Little or no evidence exists

Emerging                     Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of implementation of practice

Operational                 Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively implemented

Highly Functional        Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully integrated and effectively and consistently implemented

 

Focus Questions

Please respond to the following questions that focus on the processes that are in place to support the school’s implementation of the practices outlined in the indicators rubric.  Responses to these questions should support the school’s self-assessment on the indicators rubric.  Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.       How does the school ensure that the curriculum, instructional strategies, and assessments are aligned and articulated across grade levels in support of the expectations for student learning? <!--[endif]-->

 

The School of Technology implements curriculum – Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) and Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) - that are based on clear and measurable expectations for student learning that provide multiple opportunities for all students to acquire requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes, horizontally and vertically across grade levels. The Leadership Team and Instructional Coach audit instruction, review lesson plans and evaluate data in grade level meetings to determine the extent of curriculum alignment and articulation. The Leadership Team evaluates the data collected to determine the need for modifications in areas such as curriculum and instruction, thus ensuring curriculum alignment and articulation.

 

Horizontal curriculum alignment begins with summer workshops to develop grade level thematic units that support the GPS and QCC curriculum for each course. Development of these units involves incorporation of the district’s curriculum pacing guides, class syllabi, and technology. This year’s units are as follows: 9th grade – Conflict, Collaboration, and Compromise, 10th grade – Shades of Diversity, 11th Grade – American Innovation, and 12th Grade – Our Legacy. Activities that support these themes are interwoven in the instructional framework of each class, and reflect integration of technology to demonstrate mastery of content.

 

Vertical alignment of the curriculum is centered on GHSGT preparation. Each core subject utilizes GHSGT questions as Focus Questions during class opening or in closure for review.

Teachers from the 9th and 10th grade provide additional tutorial to 11th grade students during the Extended Day Program, thereby giving active help and encouragement to 11th grade students.

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.      In what ways does the school ensure the implementation of research-based instructional strategies, innovations, and activities that facilitate achievement for all students? <!--[endif]-->

 

During the first planning week of the school year, teachers review their subject curriculum and Thematic Unit in Grade Level and Subject Team meetings to identify areas that need support. This information is given to the Leadership Team, and they add it to the school’s Professional Development Calendar. A professional development workshop is held to review the APS Teaching Expectations and Evaluation Instrument, as well as other instructional resources that provide research-based instructional strategies, such as the Georgia Online Assessment System (GOAS). Consequently lesson plans incorporate research–based instructional strategies.

 

Common planning is a part of the culture of the School of Technology. During this time lesson plans are developed and aligned with online courses in mind, which better allow for students the inability to fall behind on course work and ultimately graduation. Lesson plans are peer reviewed weekly by the Grade Level Team and recommendations are made for modifications to improve student learning.  To accommodate this practice, InSight data are used for the beginning of the school year for student placement in Mathematics and English Language Arts classes. Lessons that address each of the three learning modalities are integrated with the onsite technologies, thereby engaging the students in the content material and addressing individualized instructional needs.

 

 

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.      What processes are implemented to ensure that teachers are well prepared and effectively implementing the curriculum? <!--[endif]-->

 

To ensure that teachers were well prepared and effectively implementing the curriculum, professional development is a mainstay of the school’s culture. A professional development calendar is provided to each teacher. This is a living document that may be modified to address the needs of the instructional staff.

 

To verify that teachers are effectively implementing the curriculum, the leadership requires teachers to submit their lesson plans electronically on Monday mornings, and lesson plans are reviewed by the administration on the BlackBoard website and during classroom observations. The Leadership provides feedback from lesson plan reviews during informal observation follow up conferences. The team leader selects a lesson plan and facilitates the evaluation of the lesson plan during weekly grade level planning meetings, and team members provide feedback.

 

 

4.   How does the school provide every student access to comprehensive information, instructional technology, and media services?

 

The school provides every student (and teacher) with a laptop computer, which enables the entire school with access to comprehensive information, instructional technology, and media services.  To retrieve comprehensive information, students have access to the media center for projects and research. The Media Center staff provides extended hours beginning at 7:30A.M. and continuing until 5:00 P.M. The flexibility in the schedule allows students to have sufficient time to effectively complete research and use media materials. Generally, during the school day, language arts teachers take a class of students to use the media center. Typically, individual students use the media center after school.

 

Through the collaborative efforts of media services, the Graduation Coach and advisory, students have created accounts on the ga411.com and College Board website to begin the process of preparing for college life. This collaboration also includes the instructional integration of Galileo to reinforce research skills and GOAS for test preparation. Teachers use Blackboard daily to monitor student’s mastery of instruction, and display student’s work to support the expectations for student learning. Through the use of Blackboard, our online database, parents have immediate access to their child’s class performance and assessment results.

 

 

 

 


Documenting & Using Results

 

STANDARD: The school enacts a comprehensive assessment system that monitors and documents performance and uses these results to improve student performance and school effectiveness.

Impact Statement:  A school is successful in meeting this standard when it uses a comprehensive assessment system based on clearly defined performance measures.  The system is used to assess student performance on expectations for student learning, evaluate the effectiveness of curriculum and instruction, and determine interventions to improve student performance.  The assessment system yields timely and accurate information that is meaningful and useful to school leaders, teachers, and other stakeholders in understanding student performance, school effectiveness, and the results of improvement efforts.

Indicators Rubric

Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are in place in the school.  The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement as well as guide and inform the school’s responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

 

 

INDICATORS

 

 

 

In fulfillment of this standard, the school:

Not Evident

Emerging

Operational

Highly Functional

4.1

Establishes performance measures for student learning that yield information that is reliable, valid, and bias free

 

 

 

X

4.2

Develops and implements a comprehensive assessment system for assessing progress toward meeting the expectations for student learning

 

 

 

X

4.3

Uses student assessment data for making decisions for continuous improvement of teaching and learning processes

 

 

 

X

4.4

Conducts a systematic analysis of instructional and organizational effectiveness and uses the results to improve student performance

 

 

 

X

4.5

Communicates the results of student performance and school effectiveness to all stakeholders

 

 

 

X

4.6

Uses comparison and trend data of student performance from comparable schools in evaluating its effectiveness

 

 

 

X

4.7

Demonstrates verifiable growth in student performance

 

 

 

X

4.8

Maintains a secure, accurate, and complete student record system in accordance with state and federal regulations

 

 

 

X

 

Definitions of Indicator Rubric

Not Evident                Little or no evidence exists

Emerging                     Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of implementation of practice

Operational                 Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively implemented

Highly Functional        Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully integrated and effectively and consistently implemented

 

Focus Questions

Please respond to the following questions that focus on the processes that are in place to support the school’s implementation of the practices outlined in the indicators rubric.  Responses to these questions should support the school’s self-assessment on the indicators rubric.  Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.       How is the assessment system currently used in your school to analyze changes in student performance?  <!--[endif]-->

 

The School of Technology assessment system is a coordinated process between the Test Coordinator and the Leadership Team. We create five-week assessments that have clearly defined performance measures that yield accurate and timely information. These assessments are aligned to the GPS and QCC and are designed for a two-fold purpose: monitoring student performance and preparation for EOCT and GHSGT. The teachers receive a school testing calendar at the beginning of the school year and email reminders during the semester.

 

Teachers are engaged in the process by providing the assessment data in Excel spreadsheets for analysis.  Technology-rich Focus activities and E, xit activities that enhance test taking abilities allow students immediate feedback from what they learned during class. The online grading system in Blackboard and Infinite Campus are utilized to post grades and illustrate academic performance.

 

The collected data are analyzed by the Leadership Team and feedback is provided to the Grade Level Teams where discussions for change and improvement of instructional strategies are held.

The feedback received by the teachers is specific to the non-mastered domains and standards, and individual student. Instructional support is provided to the teachers through modeling and professional development. The students are retested and the data analyzed for improved student performance to determine the effectiveness of the instructional strategies.

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.      What are you doing to ensure that assessment results are timely, relevant, and communicated in a way that can be used by teachers, students, parents, and external stakeholders to aid the performance of individual students? <!--[endif]-->

 

The use of the current assessment system ensures that results are timely with the pre-planned test calendar provided at the beginning of the school year to teachers, parents, and students and, results are communicated to them within a week of the assessment in formats appropriate for each party. Teachers receive data analysis feedback in Grade Level Team meetings with a focus on the link between improved instruction and improved student performance. Students receive feedback with direction to participate in tutorial sessions or opportunities to further explore the content differently. Parents receive feedback in progress reports with specific areas of student improvement identified and suggestions to assist the parent with their child’s improvement. The PTSA and LSC receive this feedback in graph format to visually experience student performance and their concerns are addressed in the appropriate forum.

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.      How are data used to understand and improve overall school effectiveness? <!--[endif]-->

 

Teachers are introduced to student data during pre-planning and it is discussed in conjunction with the SAP. As plans for improvement are discussed and instructional strategies reviewed, the professional development calendar is modified to meet the needs of the teachers which will result in improved student performance. Data is collected through out the school year from many sources; the AYP report, school benchmark assessments, EOCT and GHSGT data, and report cards. This data is consistently analyzed in Leadership Team meetings and Grade Level Team meetings, to be used in developing and modifying the instructional process.

 

The data is communicated to the LSC, where the stakeholders discuss how they can provide or secure additional resources that will improve overall school effectiveness.  Their present activity to have a crosswalk placed in front of the school is an example of the LSC role towards improving overall school effectiveness.

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.      How are teachers trained to understand and use data in the classroom?<!--[endif]-->

 

With professional development embedded in the culture and calendar of the school, teachers

receive onsite training in data analysis and the use of the technology involved. These teacher

training workshops are scheduled on the SOT calendar and include: (1) implementing the assessment process and data analysis, (2) establishing the relevancy of new instructional practices, and (3) methodology for effective parent communication. These instructional practices will include re-teaching non-mastered domains in a manner that addresses the student’s learning needs and maintains the pace of the class in covering required material, as well as keep parents aware of student performance.

 


Resource & Support Systems

 

STANDARD: The school has the resources and services necessary to support its vision and purpose and to ensure achievement for all students.

Impact Statement:  A school is successful in meeting this standard when it has sufficient human, material, and fiscal resources to implement a curriculum that enables students to achieve expectations for student learning, to meet special needs, and to comply with applicable regulations.  The school employs and allocates staff that are well qualified for their assignments.  The school provides ongoing learning opportunities for all staff to improve their effectiveness.  The school ensures compliance with applicable local, state, and federal regulations.

Indicators Rubric

Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are in place in the school.  The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement as well as guide and inform the school’s responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

 

 

INDICATORS

 

 

 

In fulfillment of this standard, the school:

Not Evident

Emerging

Operational

Highly Functional

5.1

Recruits, employs, and mentors qualified professional staff that are capable of fulfilling assigned roles and responsibilities

 

 

X

 

5.2

Assigns professional staff responsibilities based on their qualifications (i.e., professional preparation, ability, knowledge, and experience)

 

 

 

X

5.3

Ensures that all staff participate in a continuous program of professional development

 

 

 

X

5.4

Provides and assigns staff that are sufficient in number to meet the vision and purpose of the school

 

 

 

X

5.5

Budgets sufficient resources to support its educational programs and to implement its plans for improvement

 

 

 

X

5.6

Monitors all financial transactions through a recognized, regularly audited accounting system

 

 

 

X

5.7

Maintains the site, facilities, services, and equipment to provide an environment that is safe and orderly for all occupants

 

 

 

X

5.8

Possesses a written security and crisis management plan with appropriate training for stakeholders

 

 

X

 

5.9

Ensures that each student has access to guidance services that include, but are not limited to, counseling, appraisal, mentoring, staff consulting, referral, and educational and career planning

 

 

X

 

5.10

Provides appropriate support for students with special needs

 

 

 

X

 

Definitions of Indicator Rubric

Not Evident                Little or no evidence exists

Emerging                     Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of implementation of practice

Operational                 Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively implemented

Highly Functional        Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully integrated and effectively and consistently implemented

 

Focus Questions

Please respond to the following questions that focus on the processes that are in place to support the school’s implementation of the practices outlined in the indicators rubric.  Responses to these questions should support the school’s self-assessment on the indicators rubric.  Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.       What is the process for recruitment, induction, placement, development, evaluation, and retention of qualified teachers, administrators, and support staff? <!--[endif]-->

 

 

The Human Resources department of the Atlanta Public Schools develops the process for recruitment, induction, placement and retention of qualified teachers, administrators, and support staff. This process is supported at the school level through a process that involves the Leadership Team. The Team interviews candidates referred to the school and identified as highly qualified. After being hired, the staff welcomes the new teacher who receives a mentor to help him or her adjust to the school. The district also provides a Teacher Mentor to all new teachers with three or less years of teaching experience.

 

To further support teacher retention, the school makes available professional development on Best Practices and instructional technology. During the Leadership Team meetings, goals are established and interventions determined as a basis for planning professional development.  The Instructional Support and Learning Technology Specialist provide ongoing professional development to support goals by providing instructional assistance in the classroom to encourage teachers to integrate the technology tools.

 

The Atlanta Public Schools Department of Learning Excellence provides administrators with an evaluation instrument. The School of Technology uses a modified format of this instrument for informal observations conducted by the principal, assistant principal and Instructional Coaches.      A component of this instrument includes feedback with suggested Best Practices for instructional improvement. Each of the observers provides prompt feedback and when needed requests additional support for the teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.      How does the leadership ensure that the allocation of financial resources is supportive of the school’s vision, educational programs, and its plans for school improvement? <!--[endif]-->

 

The school budgets funds from three sources - the general fund, Title 1 budget, and grants - to meet the instructional requests of the teachers and enhance the use of technology in the classroom. During yearly evaluations, the Leadership Team collaborates with teachers in revisiting their growth plans and set new objectives that correlate to their professional development and instructional plan. From these objectives, the school develops orders for materials and supplies. Our teachers are encouraged to locate educational resources and manipulatives related to their subject that will serve our diverse student population. These resources include science laboratory probes, class libraries, and learning centers. The leadership team ensures that the allocation of financial resources is supportive of the school’s vision, educational programs, and its plans for school improvement by providing resources to incorporate technology throughout the curriculum.

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.      How does the leadership ensure a safe and orderly environment for students and staff? <!--[endif]-->

 

The Leadership at the School of Technology ensures a safe and orderly environment for students   and staff by following specific safety practices. The school has developed a Safety and Crisis Management plan in compliance with state and district policies.  The plan, which includes parents, law enforcement, fire department, emergency medical personnel, and community partners, is designed to protect students, staff and school property and to establish a climate that is conducive to the safety of all stakeholders and the daily instructional time is not interrupted.  The safety plan is disseminated to and reviewed with all stakeholders.  Fire, tornado, and intruder drills are held in compliance with state regulations and fire codes. 

 

The school has developed a staff duty roster for morning, lunch and after school supervision.  Adults are proactive and consistently monitor student movement and behavior.  Students enter the building through designated entry points equipped with metal detectors and all bags are inspected by staff and administrators.  Students are required to wear the school uniforms.  All students receive the student handbook with rules, expectations and consequences that are reviewed during advisory. 

 

Visitors that enter the facilities are buzzed in from the main office and must sign-in and out of the building.  Both visitors and staff are required to wear either the visitor I.D. badges or employee badges while in the building.  Security cameras are placed throughout the building and are periodically monitored by administrators.  The campus has three full-time school resource officers and one part-time evening officer. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.      What process is used to ensure and monitor that each student has access to guidance and resource services that meet the needs of the student? <!--[endif]-->

 

The process ensuring that each student has access to guidance and resource services is embedded in the Distributive Counseling model which is a part of the culture of the School of Technology as a result of its partnership with the Institute for Student Achievement. The Distributed Counseling Model has several components: team collaboration and integration of counseling strategies, a dedicated counselor integrated into the team, teachers as advisors, student-support mechanisms, consistent communication with parents, and college preparation.

 

The success of our Distributive Counseling stems from professional development at ISA workshops and a district initiative to create advisories in every high school. The workshops support the process of meeting students’ needs by certifying teacher preparation. Teachers are prepared to counsel students and guide them to appropriate resources to develop skills necessary for successful completion of high school and preparation for college.

 

Our Advisory program is successful as a conduit for our Guidance Department, with teachers monitoring each student’s behavior, work and interactions for evidence requiring intervention. Teachers may request guidance services for students who exhibit a need for one-on-one counseling by a professional. When students are experiencing academic and/or behavioral difficulties, teachers recommend them to the Student Support Team (SST). The Advisory program actively includes parents in the process by hosting a Parent Day each semester that allows parents to meet with their child’s team of teachers and interact with their child in the classroom.

 

 To further support this process, the School of Technology has implemented a Student Support committee to improve academics, attendance, and address students with behavioral issues. The committee consists of the Principal, Attendance Aide, School Social Worker, Parent Liaison, SST Chair, PEC Program Assistant, Discipline Coach, Guidance Counselor, Graduation Coach, and representative from Communities in Schools (CIS), a component of Project GRAD.  The Attendance Aide, Parent Liaison, and CIS representative contact parents of tardy, absent, or unreachable students. They then refer the student to the appropriate resource person - guidance counselor or social worker.

    

 


 

 

Stakeholder Communications & Relationships

 

STANDARD: The school fosters effective communications and relationships with and among its stakeholders.

Impact Statement:  A school is successful in meeting this standard when it has the understanding, commitment, and support of stakeholders.  School personnel seek opportunities for collaboration and shared leadership among stakeholders to help students learn and advance improvement efforts.

Indicators Rubric

Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are in place in the school.  The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement as w, ell as guide and inform the school’s responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

 

 

INDICATORS

 

 

 

In fulfillment of this standard, the school:

Not Evident

Emerging

Operational

Highly Functional

6.1

Fosters collaboration with community stakeholders to support student learning

 

 

 

X

6.2

Has formal channels to listen to and communicate with stakeholders

 

 

 

X

6.3

Solicits the knowledge and skills of stakeholders to enhance the work of the school

 

 

X

 

6.4

Communicates the expectations for student learning and goals for improvement to all stakeholders

 

 

 

X

6.5

Provides information about students, their performance, and school effectiveness that is meaningful and useful to stakeholders

 

 

 

X

 

Definitions of Indicator Rubric

Not Evident                Little or no evidence exists

Emerging                     Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of implementation of practice

Operational                 Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively implemented

Highly Functional        Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully integrated and effectively and consistently implemented

 


Focus Questions

Please respond to the following questions that focus on the processes that are in place to support the school’s implementation of the practices outlined in the indicators rubric.  Responses to these questions should support the school’s self-assessment on the indicators rubric.  Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.       How does the school’s leadership ensure that the school is responsive to community expectations and stakeholder satisfaction? <!--[endif]-->

 

The School of Technology embraces quality connections with all of its stakeholders and the community.  Essential in promoting the social, emotional and academic growth of our students is parental engagement and community involvement and participation.  The Leadership Team promotes a strong collaborative effort between the school and our business and community partners. This is accomplished through the ISA student and parent surveys, PTSA, and LSC. Information is shared with them and dialogue fostered to encourage feedback that the leadership can respond to with satisfaction.

 

This collaboration affords many opportunities for our students to gain meaningful exposure, skills, and experiences beyond the classroom. Our stakeholders provided job shadowing experiences, volunteer experiences, and visits to venues that the students otherwise would not have had. These experiences enrich and support the college preparatory education that the school provides for each student and promotes their interest in college after high school - a primary expectation. 

 

The School of Technology has entered into an agreement to promote technology with One Economy, Georgia Tech and Emory University.   In addition, the National Debate, Project GRAD, Communities in Schools, and Outward Bound Program support other special school initiatives and school projects that make our school successful in meeting the expectations of community and stakeholders. Through a continued relationship with these organizations, the School of Technology provides all students (regular education and special needs students) with the guidance and support to complete their course of study as they progress from ninth through twelfth grade. The school communicates continuously with our stakeholders through the LSC, PTSA, school’s website, and monthly newsletter.

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.      How does the school’s leadership foster a learning community? <!--[endif]-->

 

At the inception of the School of Technology, the design team established that our culture would be that of a learning community. The Leadership Team determined that to create, support, and maintain a 21st Century school professional development would have to have a stronghold in the daily operation of the school. Consequently, a professional development calendar is created at the beginning of the school year. The professional development provided to the faculty has at its core Best Practices for improved instructional strategies and the integration of technology into classroom instruction. Currently, the faculty is implementing the thematic units developed during summer professional development at Emory University.

 

The Leadership Team obtains professional development opportunities outside the building and makes recommendations for teachers to attend, with some returning as trainers for the faculty. This practice supports our model of continued instructional support for teachers and teacher collaboration on all issues involving student achievement.

 

Our open communication process with stakeholders gives them an interior view of the intricate instructional framework of the school, thereby allowing them to see a learning community at work. Highlights of teachers involved in professional development are included in the school’s newsletter and establishes teachers as role models of lifelong learning.

 

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.      What avenues are used to communicate information to stakeholders about students, their performance, and school effectiveness? <!--[endif]-->

 

The primary avenues of communication are the monthly newsletter and the class web pages. This is supported by Advisor – parent conferences or phone conversations, Parent Liaison communication with student homes, PTSA meetings, LSC meetings, and periodic meetings with business partners, such as Principal for a Day.  We share information about student performance and school effectiveness, but strive to receive input from stakeholders that will contribute to our continued improvement.

 

The Leadership Team receives responses and evaluates the responses/suggestions from stakeholders. Feedback might include a request for a change in practice resulting in the creation of new programs. The desire of parents to increase student exposure to content and enriching activities contributed to the development of the Extended Program.

 


Commitment to Continuous Improvement

 

STANDARD: The school establishes, implements, and monitors a continuous process of improvement that focuses on student performance.

Impact Statement:  A school is successful in meeting this standard when it implements a collaborative and ongoing process for improvement that aligns the functions of the school with the expectations for student learning.  Improvement efforts are sustained and the school demonstrates progress in improving student performance and school effectiveness.  New improvement efforts are informed by the results of earlier efforts through reflection and assessment of the improvement process.

Indicators Rubric

Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are in place in the school.  The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement as well as guide and inform the school’s responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

 

 

INDICATORS

 

 

 

In fulfillment of this standard, the school:

Not Evident

Emerging

Operational

Highly Functional

7.1

Engages in a continuous process of improvement that articulates the vision and purpose the school is pursuing (Vision); maintains a rich and current description of students, their performance, school effectiveness, and the school community (Profile); employs goals and interventions to improve student performance (Plan); and documents and uses the results to inform what happens next (Results)

 

 

 

X

7.2

Engages stakeholders in the processes of continuous improvement

 

 

 

X

7.3

Ensures that plans for continuous improvement are aligned with the vision and purpose of the school and expectations for student learning

 

 

 

X

7.4

Provides professional development for school personnel to help them implement improvement interventions to achieve improvement goals

 

 

 

X

7.5

Monitors and communicates the results of improvement efforts to stakeholders

 

 

 

X

7.6

Evaluates and documents the effectiveness and impact of its continuous process of improvement

 

 

 

X

 

Definitions of Indicator Rubric

Not Evident                Little or no evidence exists

Emerging                     Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of implementation of practice

Operational                 Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively implemented

 

Highly Functional        Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully integrated and effectively and consistently implemented

 

Focus Questions

Please respond to the following questions that focus on the processes that are in place to support the school’s implementation of the practices outlined in the indicators rubric.  Responses to these questions should support the school’s self-assessment on the indicators rubric.  Be thorough and concise in your answers, focusing on quality and depth over quantity.

 

  1. What is the process for continuous improvement used by the school and what are the results that this process is delivering for student performance and school effectiveness?

 

The process for continuous improvement begins with the Leadership Team and LSC that work together to coordinate and monitor the implementation of initiatives having a school-wide focus on learning across the curriculum.  Our SAP contains school-wide goals for learning that are consistent with the vision and purpose and analysis of the school’s instructional and operational effectiveness.

 

The Leadership Team translates feedback from the LSC into specific, measurable objectives for improvement that are correlated with the SAP.  The Leadership Team shares these objectives with the Grade Level Teams, and the teachers incorporate these objectives into their instructional program for student improvement. The results of these integrated objectives are provided within student work and assessments. The teachers share these results at Grade Level Team meetings and prepare a presentation for the Leadership Team. The Leadership Team examines the results in comparison to the suggested objectives and shares the data with the LSC. The LSC then determines what suggestions or actions they can make to contribute to improved student achievement and provides these suggestions to the Leadership Team.

 

It was in this process that the decision for extra 11th grade support was made. Students in the mathematics and science classrooms received additional support from Georgia Tech tutors. Those students needing more support in mathematics were partnered with a Georgia Tech mentor and given extra instruction during the Extended Day Program. The English Language Arts class received a co-teacher to provide extra assistance for struggling readers and writers. As a result, the 11th grade students, as first time test takers, surpassed all expectations in their performance on the GHSGT.

 

.

  1. What steps are taken to ensure that the improvement goals reflect student-learning needs that are aligned with the vision and purpose of the school?

 

Grade level team meetings provide a consistent forum for discussions about student achievement at each grade level. During Grade Level Team meetings, teachers’ discussions of student learning include addressing the needs of individual students, integration of curriculum, designing lessons to increase student achievement, and developing assessments to monitor student progress. The team leader facilitates these meetings and maintains the group’s focus on aligning improvement efforts with the school’s vision and mission. Team Leaders funnel information from grade level meetings to the Leadership Team. When the Leadership Team convenes it reviews feedback from the grade level meetings, assesses the implementation of the SAP, and makes modifications as needed.

 

 

 

  1. What process is used to ensure that the school personnel are provided professional development and technical assistance to implement interventions and achieve improvement goals?

 

Our school culture has a threefold professional development structure. The three primary areas of focus are instruction, technology integration, and advisory. The process involves our use of weekly on-site professional development. During the first semester, a day is set aside each week to provide identified instructional strategies and technical assistance to teachers. The teacher training has increased integration of other available technologies in daily instruction. As a result the Blackboard websites are more student-friendly and more hands-on technology activities are a part of daily instruction.

 

In addition to providing technical assistance for technology integration, an ongoing professional development initiative gives teachers tools to improve their efficiency in advisory. Since February of 2008 the district has sponsored professional development workshops to strengthen the Advisory component, and Grade Level Teams put the Distributive Counseling Model into action. A benefit of the program is that an advisor and Grade Level Team can more readily identify when a student is in trouble and meet his or her needs immediately. The speedy response to a student can be directly linked to student success through tutorial referrals, parent contacts, and mentoring. As a result of teacher training in advisory, our students are receiving better instruction and intervention. Consequently, the school has experienced an improved attendance rate and an increase in the percentage of passing test scores.

 

 

 

  1. How does the leadership ensure that the improvement plan is implemented, monitored, achieved, and communicated to stakeholders?

 

The improvement plan with goals and objectives is outlined in the School Achievement Plan. The Leadership Team develops and monitors the SAP. The LSC also assists in monitoring the plan to identify additional resources that support the schools goals. Data received from regular assessments are analyzed with reference to the prescribed plan. At Grade Level Team meetings, teachers analyze data, discuss instructional strategies, and subsequently develop lesson plans. Following a peer review of lesson plans, teachers provide instruction to improve students’ performance. The results are shared with the Grade Level Team, and these data are taken back to the Leadership Team.

 

The LSC is kept abreast of the instructional modifications and results as they review and monitor the implementation of the School Achievement Plan. They provide input to the Leadership Team related primarily to the need for additional resources to improve student learning. In that regard the LSC also solicits additional resources from the community that will directly impact student achievement. Currently, the LSC project is to have a crosswalk placed at the MARTA bus stop directly across from the school’s campus.

 

When the progress of the Plan has been evaluated by the Leadership Team, the information is shared with the Grade Level Team members. Each teacher in turn shares appropriate information with his or her advisees. The Parent Liaison and administrators share the information with parents via the school website, PTSA meetings, parent conferences, and monthly newsletters. The leadership and advisors receive feedback from stakeholders and they share this information during Leadership Team meetings.


Peer-to-Peer Practice Submission

 

Prior to completing this report, you will be asked to submit a peer-to-peer practice.  You may submit a practice at any time prior to submitting your report by going to www.advanc-ed.org/resourcenetwork and clicking “Submit a practice.”  You can also follow the instructions contained in the online Standards Assessment Report.

 

Background

A peer-to-peer practice is a description of interventions, strategies, programs, or activities that have been identified by a school/district to be effective.  It includes practices that support classroom teachers and/or schools/districts in their efforts to improve student learning.

 

Examples of practices that have been submitted include: 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->         <!--[endif]-->Classroom improvements

Sample practices submitted:  Atlas Mapping Skills, Buddy Reading Groups, Student Folders/Portfolios

<!--[if !supportLists]-->         <!--[endif]-->School improvements

Sample practices submitted:  Collaborative planning, after-school tutoring, academy programs for freshmen and sophomores, etc.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->         <!--[endif]-->District/system improvements

Sample practices submitted:  6+1 Writing Traits, Implementing School Improvement; Career Development

 

The submission form asks for the following information:

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.      <!--[endif]-->Name of the practice

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->After-school and summer enrichment/tutorial program

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.      <!--[endif]-->Contact information for the practice

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Adrienne Doanes, 404-802-4426, adoanes@atlanta.k12.ga.us

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.      <!--[endif]-->Description of the practice

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]--> The after-school and summer enrichment/tutorial program assist students that are at risk for dropping out of school and/or being unsuccessful academically. It is designed to assist with , academic and social needs of high school students.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->It is implemented three days per week during the fall and spring semesters. It is implemented during a six week period during the summer.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->The students receive tutorial in all subjects for remediation and enrichment.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->The students receive assistance with completing homework assignments.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Students participated in extra-curricular activities: Robotics, Chess Club, Debate Team, Video Production, Geek Squad, Mentor Groups

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->The set of data applies to only the present 12th grade class who have participated in the program for the last three years.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->The program success is the 11th grade Georgia High School Graduation Test results.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->2007-2008 Writing Exam – 85% pass rate

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->2007-2008 English Exam – 81% pass rate

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->2007-2008 Math Exam – 89% pass rate

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->2007-2008 Science Exam – 72% pass rate

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->2007-2008 Social Studies Exam – 91% pass rate

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Of the incoming 9th graders in 2005-2006 school year, a record 85% are on track for graduation in May 2009. (Class of 2009)

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->The graduation rate for the state of Georgia is 70% (Governor’s Office of Student Achievement, 2006)

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->The graduation rate for African-American males is nearly 50% (US Department of Education, 2005)

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->When students do not succeed academically early on during their high school experience, they are more likely to drop out of school prior to graduation (Nelson, 2006).

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.      <!--[endif]-->Reason for the practice

      Describe the problems you addressed with this practice or the reason you chose to   

      implement the practice.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Approximately 30% of those students entering as ninth graders were below grade level in language arts and mathematics.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Homework completion rate was low

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Average student performance in core subjects was below a grade of 74 (C-).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Academic achievement is poor among minority students in the areas of reading and mathematics, as measured by the Georgia End of Course Tests and Georgia High School Graduation Tests (Governor’s Office of Student Achievement, 2007).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Only 70% of GA students graduate from High School.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Loitering on campus or in close proximity of the school between the hours of 3:30P.M. and 6:00P.M.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Extra-curricular clubs and organizations in the Extended Day Program provided structured activities.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Students identified as at-risk were partnered with College Mentors

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Academic achievement in the ninth grade is key indicator for success in high school (ISA, 2007).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Providing quality interventions, such as and academic focused after school program can assist many students achieve at higher levels (NASE, 2006).

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->5.      <!--[endif]-->Subject areas, grade levels, student groups, and adult groups – Select from a list of choices the various areas, levels, and groups to which the practice applies

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Subjects: mathematics, language arts, science, and social studies, and technology

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Grades 9-12

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Free and Reduced lunch population

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->58% Male population

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->6.      <!--[endif]-->Length of implementation of the practice

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Year 3 (2005-Current)

<!--[if !supportLists]-->7.      <!--[endif]-->Resources needed to implement the practice

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->4-8 instructors and an additional 2-4 teacher assistances

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Material (Equipment for robotics, video production and geek squad programs that include; laptops, video cameras and robotics kits).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Financial Resources – Received assistance from a grant that we wrote from the Georgia Department of Human Resources (DHR) - $80,000

<!--[if !supportLists]-->8.      <!--[endif]-->Research

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Studies (Miller, 2003) have shown that time spent after hours in structured groups doing homework and participating in extracurricular activities is associated with higher test scores and grades.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]--> After school programs provide opportunities for kids to be supervised while their parents are at work. Students can get snacks, homework help and participate in fun activities (Anderson, 2005).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Parents support after school programs that assist them with keeping their children safe, focused on school related activities, and out of trouble (University of Chicago, 2003).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->After school programs influences the development of children socially, academically and emotionally (U. S. Department of Education, 2003).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->After school time has been associated with higher grades, improved self image, and increased interest in post-secondary education (American Youth Policy Forum, 2003).

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->More parents are working outside the home for longer hours. The demand for quality after school programs has increased over the past two decades. The difference between parents’ work schedules and school hours differs 20-25 hours per week (Child Nutrition Policy Brief, 2001).

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Anderson, E. (2005). Strengths-based educating: A concrete way to bring out the best in students--and yourself. The confessions of an educator who got it right--finally! The quest for strengths. Educational Horizons, 83(3), 180-189.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Georgia Department of Education. (2006). School report. [Online]. Available: www.doe.k12.ga.us

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Greene, L., Foster, G. (2003). Public high school graduation and college readiness rates in the United States. The Manhattan Institute.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Miller, B.M. (2003). Critical hours: Afterschool programs and educational success. Quincy, MA. Nellie Mae Educational Foundation.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Nelson, A. (2006). Closing the achievement gap: Keeping kids in school, ASCD Infobrief, 46, 1-2.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->U. S. Department of Education. (2003). When schools stay open late: The national evaluation of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program. Washington, DC: Author. [Online]. Available: www.ed.gov/pubs21cent/firstyear/index.html

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->University of Chicago. (2003). After school programs support children’s literacy development: NRPA youth services. Parks & Recreation.

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->9.      <!--[endif]-->Conclusion

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Implement the program during the 2008-2009 school year.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Continue to monitor student progress using progress reports, report cards, attendance and discipline data. Utilize pre-assessment data for the SAT and GHSGT.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->o   <!--[endif]-->Monitor student’s progress through the advisory support model and ensure students are engaged in the program.

 

 

 

 

As you identify a practice for submission, you may want to ask some basic questions.  Does the potential practice have:  1) a defined problem or specific reason why you implemented the practice; 2) a research base or a research-based premise; and 3) documented results?  If the answers to these questions are yes, you have a good practice to submit.

 

Submitting a practice allows the school to highlight a practice that it feels is indicative of the quality work occurring in the school.  The practice is included in the online AdvancED Resource Network where it can be accessed by other practitioners using the network. 

 


Conclusion

 

The following focus questions reflect the school’s overall analysis of its internal evaluation of the accreditation standards.

 

 

Focus Questions

 

  1. As you review your responses to the standards, what major trends, themes, or areas of focus emerge that cut across the seven standards?

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->ü  Based on test scores and surveys, we are doing a great job with our students and we have good stakeholder support. <!--[endif]-->

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->ü  The Leadership Team is an integral part of the operation of the school, and this is apparent in each of the seven standards.  Professional development has been is a mainstay in the culture of the School of Technology.<!--[endif]-->

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->ü  As we reviewed each standard we noticed our parents need to be more actively involved in our school. Although we have parents who are active, involved, contentious, and available, we are going to have to continue to investigate new ways to improve our parental involvement.<!--[endif]-->

 

<!--[if !supportLists]-->ü  The Extended Day Program is vital to the academic and social improvement of our students. A grant from the Georgia Department of Human Resources supports this program, and we have access to college students from Georgia Tech, who serve as tutors. Therefore, we are able to provide this service free to our students.<!--[endif]-->

 

 

  1. Based on your review of these cross-cutting themes/trends and each of the seven standards, what would you consider to be your school’s greatest strengths?

 

Our primary strength is our faculty.  The teachers are dedicated, hardworking, knowledgeable, and willing to learn new things. The integration of professional development and regular weekly team meetings into the school day places a strenuous demand on teachers. Yet the faculty does so and consistently provide our students with rigorous, engaging instruction.

 

 

  1. What would you consider to be your school’s greatest challenges?

 

We have numerous challenges that we face as a school. One of our greatest challenges is maintaining a changed culture from the perspective of the student’s community.  The culture of the community invades the school and helping the children to recognize and maintain a safe and academic environment is an ongoing challenge. They return home daily to situations that may not support academia and as teachers we have to be diligently consistent in providing support - morally, emotionally, and academically.

 

Increasing parental involvement is an ongoing challenge that is coupled with the challenge of a   non-academic community. The impact of the community on our students implores us to consistently reinforce college as an option, enrich their academic experiences with field trips        that expose them to different cultures, and provide opportunities through extra-curricular activities that will improve them academically.

 

Another challenge is changing the delivery of instruction to reflect a 21st Century education. This is not an easy task. It requires a teacher to change their perspective of lesson delivery and the way children learn. Teachers must explore the myriad of delivery techniques that are supported by integrating technology in classroom instruction.  In turn this encourages the district to provide us with continued technical support.

 

 

  1. How will you use the insights gained from this self-assessment to inform and enhance your quality assurance and continuous improvement efforts?

 

The insight gained from this self-assessment will be used by the Leadership Team to tailor our School Achievement Plan. This will involve looking at specific practices that work and determining how to integrate them across the school, and determining what practices need to be purged from our instructional framework.

 

We will become more diligent in our efforts to increase parental involvement. This may include providing services that will improve the quality of life for some of our parents and persons within the community. Such services may include free computer literacy classes.